Remonzer’s Weblog

everything that I am learning in EDUC 628

MOO, MUD and mayhem September 14, 2007

Filed under: Uncategorized — remonzer @ 4:08 am

I ended up reading two articles from The Lost Library of MOO  and visiting an additional site, http://cinemaspace.berkeley.edu/~rachel/moo.html, outside the library because I wasn’t quite sure what I was reading about in ftp://sunsite.unc.edu/pub/academic/communications/papers/muds/muds/Ethnography-of-a-Computer-Society and http://sunsite.unc.edu/cmc/mag/1995/jan/fanderclai.html, although the former makes sense after reading the latter.  Unfortunately for me, I did not read them in that order.

When I first clicked on “muds-of-a-Computer-Society” and started reading, I was intrigued because it sounded something like a Dungeons and Dragons setup.  I used to play D and D a little, back in the day.  But, then I kept reading about commands that needed to be implemented and thought, “Oh no, not DOS.”  After reading the article from Rachel’s Super MOO List, I learned that MOOs are written in a language that is a cross between C++ and LISP, called MOOCode. MOOCode is a form of OOP (Object Oriented Programming) and that users of MOOs can get what is called a Programming Bit (basically a level of access to the core computer) that allows them to program in MOOCode. Most MOOs have information about this by typing ‘help programming’. 

I have had good and bad experience with programming.  The good news first:  I learned about DOS from my first computer class and could use it if need be.  (That is, if I can find my manual.)  The bad news:  I took a beginning computer programming class and survived only because I had a very good partner.  (By the way, I’m all for paired activities.) Strangely enough though, I am interested in learning computer languages.  The problem is my processor doesn’t process so fast anymore.

In the multi-user environments of MOOs and MUDs, not only can students learn programming language, but can also involve themselves in creative writing projects that have no bounds (unless a teacher decides to set some parameters) or take part in games which also involve a great deal of imagination and writing as the operation is primarily text-based.  With my Spanish classes, I could design an arrangement between my students and those in a Spanish-speaking country for a intercultural exchange of language, ideas, and fun.

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One Response to “MOO, MUD and mayhem”

  1. dancingnancy533 Says:

    I have never played D & D before, but my best friend plays and he loves it. I may check it out. Anywho, back to my commnet, I’ve always wanted to learn computer programming like C++, but just never found a course I wanted to take. With MOOs and MUDs, students can be put in the right environment to learn all of the programming. That would be interesting to set up a connection a Spanish speaking country.

    I’ve always wondered what other countries think of our history. A MUD may provide the right forum to debate certain perioids of history and provide multiple perspectives for students.


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