Remonzer’s Weblog

everything that I am learning in EDUC 628

Gender Differences in Language? March 9, 2008

Filed under: EDUC 628 — remonzer @ 5:35 pm

I wonder what further significance the study of gender differences referenced in the article found at http://durandus.com/phaedrus/2008/03/07/gender-differences-in-language/ could have for foreign language teachers.  Already, I have observed that by and large male sophomores perform better than freshmen.  Most of the reason for this phenomenon I attributed to maturity.  With this study, I have a lot more to think about when planning lessons and especially assessment. 

It is not surprising to learn that gender differences in language may be biological because grown men and women have different communication styles, which sometimes cause big problems.  I found this chart

this-diagram-created-using-inspiration.doc

at: http://www.ed.uiuc.edu/courses/edpsy313/inspiration/tannen.html

A quick google search will bring up tons of links that contain theories and notions about the variations in the way that women and men express themselves.  As stated in phaedrus, “This could be the missing piece of the pie and the implications could be far reaching.”  We may be able to disprove the old hypothesis (j/k) that men are from Mars and women are from Venus.

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3 Responses to “Gender Differences in Language?”

  1. Nate Lowell Says:

    What’s interesting in the chart is that those behaviors LOOK like they’re all socializations and not genetic. Women are trained to behave one way and men another.

    The important thing to remember about the language study is that it’s the first time there is a demonstratively significant difference in the way the brains of boys and girls work when faced with language related tasks.

    I’d REALLY like to see if those differences are maintained over time and if they exist in young kids. It’s not inconceivable that the differences in brain activation are based on some kind of early childhood socialization.

    I’m just thinking back to the number of times I heard “Did you HEAR ME, young man??” growing up. This study seems to indicate that — maybe I didn’t. 🙂

  2. remonzer Says:

    …and those socialization patterns are SO hard to change.

  3. gnewsome Says:

    Remona,
    Thanks so much for this information. Something to think about in the classroom. Interesting.


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